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Reading: Constructing the Caribbean Court of Justice: How Ideas Inform Institutional Choices

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Constructing the Caribbean Court of Justice: How Ideas Inform Institutional Choices

Authors:

Joris Kocken ,

Faculty of Law at the University of Amsterdam and University of Groningen Department of International Relations and International Organization, NL
About Joris
Joris Kocken is Associate Professor of Legal Theory at Faculty of Law at the University of Amsterdam and assistant professor at the University of Groningen, Department of International Relations and International Organization, the Netherlands. His research interests focus on the intersections between law and politicsand law and morality. In the past he lived and worked on the island of Curaçao. Hispublications include: 'Questioning Legitimacy or Why Social Scientists Find Legitimacy Where None Exists', Recht der Werkelijkheid (Special Issue on MaxWeber), No. 3, pp.7-18, 2008; and (with A van Hoek) The Implementation of the Directive 2008/52/EC, Commercial and Civil Mediation, Country report The Netherlands, 2011.
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Gerda van Roozendaal

Assistant Professor at the University of Groningen, Departmentof International Relations and International Organization
About Gerda

Gerda van Roozendaal is Assistant Professor at the University of Groningen, Departmentof International Relations and International Organization. Her research interests focus on the development of institutions operating in an international context, and on international economic issues. In the past she lived and worked on the island of Curaçao. Her recent publications include: (with H. W. Hoen) 'How China's Investment Regime Changed: an institutional approach', China and the European Union. Concord or conflict?by J. van der Harst and P. Swieringa (eds) Shaker Publishing, pp.146-166, 2012; and 'Why International Financial Institutions Adopt Labour Standards. The Case of the European Investment Bank', Studia Diplomatica,Vol. LXV, No. 2, pp.59-77, 2012.

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Abstract

Abstract:

The Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) is a relatively new legal institution in the Caribbean. This article explores the question of where this specific way of institutionalizing conflict resolution came from and in which way its success (or lack of it) can be accounted for. The authors analyse the support for and opposition to the CCJ found in four issues: economic progress, sovereignty, identity and trust. Their approach to institutionalization shows that only one of the four issues discussed – economic progress – has led to substantial and decisive support for the CCJ in its original jurisdiction as aCARICOM court. Lacking such economic drive, the other function of CCJ, which is becoming the successor of the British Privy Council as the shared regional appellate court, is still by and large withheld regional support. In general, the absence of common sovereignty, identity and trust continues to hamper regional cooperation in the Caribbean.

Resumen: Construyendo la Corte de Justicia del Caribe: Cómo las ideas fundamentan las decisiones institucionales

La Corte Caribeña de Justicia (CCJ) es una institución legal relativamente nueva en el Caribe. Este artículo explora la cuestión de dónde viene esta forma específica de institucionalizar la resolución de conflictos y de qué manera su éxito (o falta de ella) puede tomarse en cuenta. Los autores analizan el apoyo y la oposición a la CCJ encontrados en cuatro temas: el progreso económico, la soberanía, la identidad y la confianza. Su acercamiento a la institucionalización muestra que sólo uno de los cuatro temas tratados – el progreso económico – ha conducido a un apoyo sustancial y decisivo para la CCJ en su jurisdicción original como tribunal CARICOu. A falta de dinamismo económico, la otra función de la CCJ, la cual se convirtió en el sucesor del Consejo Privado británico como el tribunal de apelación regional compartida, sigue siendo en general el apoyo regional retenido. En general, la ausencia de soberanía común, la identidad y la confianza sigue obstaculizando la cooperación regional en el Caribe.

DOI: http://doi.org/10.18352/erlacs.8366
How to Cite: Kocken, J., & van Roozendaal, G. (2012). Constructing the Caribbean Court of Justice: How Ideas Inform Institutional Choices. ERLACS, (93), 95–112. DOI: http://doi.org/10.18352/erlacs.8366
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Published on 20 Oct 2012.
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